Digital Nomad Stories

From Backpacker to Travel Entrepreneur: Finding Purpose, Love, and Digital Nomad Insights from Georgia

September 18, 2023 Anne Claessen Season 2 Episode 148
Digital Nomad Stories
From Backpacker to Travel Entrepreneur: Finding Purpose, Love, and Digital Nomad Insights from Georgia
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever dreamt of tossing aside the mundane, selling everything you own, and trotting off around the globe? Bailey Lammon did just that. Inspired by a solitary hike, Bailey transformed from a travel enthusiast into a full-time digital nomad. 

She shares her personal journey of this shift from a world explorer to an expert travel planner, along with the roller-coaster of emotions and enlightening moments she encountered. Listen in to hear Bailey’s tale of how she converted her passion for travel into a successful online business.

Connect with Bailey:

Connect with Kendra:

Anne Claessen:

Hey Nomads, welcome to Digital Nomad Stories, the podcast. My name is Anik Lassen and, together with my co-host, kendra Hosse, we interview digital nomads. Why? Because we want to share stories of how they did it. We talk about remote work, online business, location independency, freelancing, travel and, of course, about the digital nomad lifestyle. Do you want to know more about us and access all previous episodes? Visit digitalnomadsco. Alright over to Kendra for today's interview.

Kendra Hasse:

Welcome to Digital Nomads. Though it's the podcast, my name is Kendra and I'm your host today. Today I'm joined by Bailey Lammon and she transitions from a full-time traveler to a full-time digital nomad while she's working as a travel planner, and in our conversation before she said she loves to get to know humans and I love to scroll, and that's why I'm super excited to have her here today. Welcome, Bailey. Thank you so much for having me. Where are you right now? Why are we having this conversation?

Bailey Lammon:

I'm currently in Sigmund Nagy, georgia. It's the wine country in Georgia Cuckhattie region. Oh, excited.

Kendra Hasse:

I think that's a cool destiny where later we can talk about. But to start, it would be nice to hear a little bit about your story, about you as a person. So for you, the Digital Nomad story started really with being a big picker, right?

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, so basically I was living in Seattle, washington, and I was working at the headquarters for Big Coffee Corporation and it was a funny twist of events that brought me there anyways. But I thought maybe I would be able to climb the corporate ladder and be able to use my anthropology degree for this big corporation to do good things for the world. And in the end my soul was just crushed a bit and I didn't know how to get out of it. I didn't know what my next step would be. I was applying for all these jobs and I just, I don't know, wasn't feeling the vibes, so to say.

Bailey Lammon:

As too many of us happened, yeah, exactly, and I had only traveled out of the country one time in my whole life before. That was on a two week vacation in 2019, which is like such a typical American story. And while I was just going through this really rough time in my life, like I broke up with my boyfriend, I was struggling with work. I was like what the hell am I doing with my life? And then I can avid hiker. And so one day I was just climbing this mountain by myself, like struggling my way up, and when I got to the top, it just like was so bursting of like adrenaline and confidence and I was like what the heck am I doing with my life? Now's the time I'm going to figure it out sitting on top of this mountain and I just had this like epiphany.

Bailey Lammon:

That was like, well, you know, if you know, money didn't matter, time didn't matter, what would you do with your life? And in that moment I was like I would travel the world and on the whole way back down the mountain by myself, hiking down, I just plan the entire thing out like I'm going to leave at the end of my lease, I'm going to sell my car, I'm going to make a bunch of money like in all these ways, and I'm going to start in Barcelona, because that's the only place practically I've been and I know in Spain anyways, barcelona came later, but I knew I'd start in Spain and by the time I got to my car I just had it completely figured out. And so yeah, six months later I sold everything I owned, my lease ended and then I started backpacking. That was the story of how I started.

Kendra Hasse:

That sounds nice. And how did you feel in this moment, hiking down the hill like the mountain, making all the plans.

Bailey Lammon:

Oh man, it just felt like the most right moment of my entire life, like maybe start crying thinking about it, just realizing you know, after all, these self-published books I read as like a young adult and just like wow, like realizing that the whole world just like opened up for me in that moment was just the best, the best feeling ever.

Kendra Hasse:

And then you said like half a year later, you really started in this half a year. Did you have some moments of doubt or like how was this preparation phase for you?

Bailey Lammon:

I loved this preparation phase because it was like such a roller coaster and I think I don't know if I had too much doubt because I knew that I was going to do it. Like I was so convinced that the move and no matter what anyone told me like this is what I'm doing, even if I only lasted one month or six months, like I didn't care. I think the funniest thing was like how many times I wrote in my journal like am I crazy? Is this actually crazy? And I did so many crazy things. Like I was getting all these jobs.

Bailey Lammon:

I once flew to Phoenix, arizona, to like meet this random person that I met from a person that was supposed to give me a job, and it ended up being amazing. Like I was going to work for the PGA tour, traveling around doing data collection for them. Just this job like fell in my lap. It was honestly like the universe was like doing that thing where it conspires for you, and then you just start doing all these extra crazy things and you think that that's right. And then you do it and you're like I'm actually crazy. Like am I killing myself right now? But then it all works out and it was nuts, but best time of my life.

Bailey Lammon:

Not really the year after was the best time of my life. But this was such a fun and exciting time. But I think the hardest thing was getting through to my parents who were like what are you trying to prove and I don't know, worried about me and stuff. But I knew this was the path.

Kendra Hasse:

I remember this time. I feel it's really when, as you just describe, it's just a sign that it's your way, you're on the right way. So universe like collaborating, co-creating with you, and okay, how do I talk to my parents? Nice, and then you start it. And how long have you been a backpacker?

Bailey Lammon:

so I actually this is a crazy. This is one of those crazy stories I started just before COVID. Like I left in February of 2020, so that beginning time was yikes. You know, I left, I was in Barcelona for like two weeks and then the world shut down like everything. And so, you know, I was in that crazy moment where it was like do you go home? Do you stick it out? Is it gonna be two weeks? I had one doubt moment where I was like, okay, maybe I'll go home, and I called my dad and I said like okay, dad, like should I come home? And I was so surprised because he actually told me no, but for the bad reason, you know, because he was like, if you come home, when you bring COVID, like your mom is immunocompromised, like you could kill her, and I was like, okay, yeah, great, well, I won't come home because I don't want to hurt anybody and I didn't want to come home anyways.

Bailey Lammon:

I was on this journey for a long time and so I stayed. I stayed in Barcelona. I got an Airbnb. I spent half of my savings basically just living by myself in the windowless apartment while the world shut down. It was super crazy. So that was the beginning of a puncher it, but after, like, I was in, I was in Spain for like four and a half months and when I got out I was able to kind of navigate like which countries were still open, which ones, you know, could I get in, without tests or, you know, at that time, without vaccinations of course, and kind of bounced around and just made it work and had a brilliant time.

Kendra Hasse:

Great, yeah, so you had like also the flexibility to see to which countries you can go in that COVID time, because you didn't have this strict plan you needed to follow.

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, exactly. I mean, yeah, I had like kind of the original idea that I would just travel all around central Europe, kind of like most backpackers do from the States. But because my visa expired, of course, while I was like sitting in this apartment, I kind of only had a few options. So I ended up going to the UK and I spent a month there working in hostel and then I went over to Croatia and because Eastern Europe was like basically mostly open, I spent a month traveling around Croatia and then I went to Turkey and actually it was crazy because so many people were in Turkey like all of the backpackers were flooding to Turkey, because it was one of the only countries I was open, so I spent some time there. That's where I met my boyfriend.

Kendra Hasse:

So I also want to talk about this boyfriend, as we have talked, but let's keep ones in your story. So then you are traveling as a backpacker in COVID times, having jobs from here to there to live, and then you said you in some point you became a digital norm. But so what is really for you the difference from being a backpacker than being like a digital norm? It's a really good question.

Bailey Lammon:

It's taken me years to kind of, I think, fully make this transition, because during COVID, like everything was locked down, of course. So it was like, what else do you do? I wasn't working, I had no, I had nothing but a laptop and a Kindle in this apartment and I actually ended up starting to trade in the stock market. I found it super fascinating and it was like the most brilliant time to be a stock trader, because the market was going crazy and it was awesome because that actually helped me to travel for like a whole another year, just kind of messing around and like learning technical analysis and this kind of stuff. But I wouldn't consider that like my digital norm at days. This is like just to keep me going, because I knew, like the moment that I started traveling, like I had this idea okay, I will travel for one year, I'll figure out my life or something, hoping that I would just kind of find something along the way, and I knew the stock trading wasn't forever. But it was just like how do I keep this going? How do I you know, because I spent half my budget just sitting in COVID times like how do I keep traveling now that I actually get to be a traveler. I tried to learn how to be a you know English teacher online. This was just not for me. It's for a lot of people a lot of people I know really like it, but I did not get the grasp. So I was trading again. I'm my boyfriend, who is also a stock trader, which is kind of how we like got to know each other. So we were trading and traveling together and then eventually the market started slowing down and I was like, okay, like what do I do? Because I'm not good enough to keep trading. I don't, you know, even hit the PD2 rule, which is just this crazy. You know, if you don't have enough money, then you have to follow all these rules, and it was really difficult to actually make a living. So I actually got on to Upwork and this was something I kind of tried to do in 2019, when I was like trying to save money for traveling.

Bailey Lammon:

I was doing all these different random jobs and I got back on Upwork in 2021 and just started taking on whatever I could find, like one job. I, I like connected somebody that I had met in Bosnia who lived in Belgium, and this guy was traveling from America or he lived in Romania and was traveling to the Netherlands for surgery. Anyways, I connected these people for money. It worked and I, just as I continued to take on different jobs through Upwork, I kind of like found that I was applying for more and more virtual assistant jobs, but not because I wanted to be a virtual assistant, but because I could do the travel planning and this is like such a job that a virtual assistant does.

Bailey Lammon:

And then I just kind of slowly, slowly started taking on more travel planning jobs and eventually found myself planning someone's entire year trip around the world and that was like a huge undertaking and super awesome. And this is kind of how I started my business officially, like transferring from Upwork to having a business, and then I became a travel planner, like professional travel planner, and I've been doing that since, which was May of 2022, so almost a year and a half. So this transition from like being a backpacker growing back to your question was like well before we go back to this question.

Kendra Hasse:

I just knew like some listen us. Now I know that we lost them with the thoughts. Upwork that sounds like a cool possibility for me and so maybe we put like a little recommendations for them. So you just did your profile in Upwork and you applied via the platform to open positions, or did the people reach out to you? Well, how did you do it?

Bailey Lammon:

yeah, in the beginning I was just spending hours like searching, browsing through all of the open positions and applying for anything that I even found remotely interesting or believed in myself for, because some of them I was like I don't know if I've never done this before, like blog writing. One time I took on a you know, I was like writing blogs for just some a random website about, like grass. Honestly, it was such a weird job, but it was something that I just thought maybe I could do, and so I was just applying and taking on like whatever someone would accept me for and eventually, like then I would start getting people to contact me. Once I started getting a few reviews, which was super nice. So for a little while I was getting people that were contacting me solely, and then I was getting enough work this way and. But originally, yeah, I was just browsing, like what do I want to do? I don't even know, but I need money, so I'll, I'll, I'll, I'll do whatever.

Kendra Hasse:

No, but thanks for this little. I think that's a nice inspiration for some who think, oh, I would like to be on the road but I don't know have to fix job yet my business is not paying me or the bill. So I work and I feel what you just said. Sometimes it's a little bit like searching all the time, doing little jobs until we have like some reviews and then we can get to other jobs and then eventually we realize we have a potential in a certain area where we can build our business, as you.

Bailey Lammon:

Exactly. Yeah, it was just such a transition from like I have no idea what I would do to Wow, I can actually be a travel planner and I'm actually really good at it and I enjoy it. Like it was such a cool thing also to discover in myself.

Kendra Hasse:

Yeah, so you said then. From then you decided to build your own business as a travel planner and that was a little bit for you like this condition and to becoming a digital normal.

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, definitely, I was in South America at the time, like traveling through, running out of money, I think, just one of those crazy things that happens. You want this life so desperately and you just try everything and then the universe kind of drops out a little hint like okay, here you go. Here's like a little taste of what you really want. And, yeah, I got this like more full-time position, trying, you know, helping these people, this family, even travel around the world like full-time travel, like personal travel planner.

Bailey Lammon:

And I wouldn't say this was like it wasn't like Monday on the backpacker Friday or the other way around. You know, monday on the digital, normal Friday on the backpacker. It was still kind of like we were traveling on whatever days we wanted, because I was working from my, you know, on my computer and we would just travel on a random Wednesday or we'd move every few days, or like we was still definitely in this backpacker mindset of like moving, moving, moving super fast, or saying one week and then moving, you know, every week or every few days. Still, I think the full transition didn't even come until really this year. I think I kind of pushed it off so hard Like I didn't want to slow down. I'm still so amped to keep traveling and keep exploring that it took a lot of force for me to kind of be like okay, I need to create a schedule, I need to be working these hours Monday through Friday just for my own brain to work. So yeah, that's been a recent thing. So now I'm officially a digital nomad.

Kendra Hasse:

So just like if I, if I see, if I am the stuff for you, the digital nomad is really slowing down in the traveling not being like on the road over time, and really also structure your week, your travel plans, by a working schedule.

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, yeah, here's now. We travel like only on the weekends. You know we don't take off a day of work so much to travel, unless there's like a very specific flight. You know that's like half the cost to fly on a Tuesday rather than a Saturday or something like that. Or there's a three day weekend, like I just took my first ever three day holiday weekend, kind of digital nomad, but yeah, so traveling like only, yeah, only on the weekends and no, that's it. I think that's the only thing that I can really say is definite, like we stay now for one, two weeks minimum in one place and maximum like a month in one city or one house.

Kendra Hasse:

Well, and I feel that's like some people say, oh, it's so less you know, because therefore, I need to stay three, four, five months in one place. So, logistics, video, right. For others, I feel it's something really like individual. And now I'm curious, because you told us your story and you started alone. You're alone in this apartment in Barcelona and now you're all the time talking about a week and you already gave a little hint, you met your boyfriend.

Kendra Hasse:

Maybe you can, because this is also always an interesting topic how to meet a partner being on the road, and then this lifestyle. Maybe you can share a little bit about this.

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, I have met many people on my travels, like you know, just casually, in hostels and couchsurfing, meetups and things like that. You know, meeting many people in general, and then also like ending up finding a small connection with a few here and there. But yes, I met my boyfriend in Istanbul at a hostel and we connected on our similar jobs. We were both trading stocks him much more seriously than me. I didn't really realize until later how much more of a professional stock trader he is Versus me. I was like just getting into it and really excited about it and interested and it's.

Bailey Lammon:

I'm not really sure how to start this, but I think, like because I don't know, I'm so amped about like I'm super social and I'm super like move, move, move, meet everyone, hear their stories. I'm fascinated by everyone else's how they got traveling, why they're traveling, how long they're traveling. I think it was just kind of very serendipitous for me to meet someone who was also a full-time traveler and also stock trading and also really excited about seeing the world. Yeah, I don't really hear a lot of other people meeting like this, so maybe it's a bit unique. But yeah, what do you want to know?

Kendra Hasse:

No, I would ask you. It's still a little bit unique, but it might be the new way of dating in our digital know-it-life set. So maybe you just share some. What would you fear? What were like some challenges you faced in this dating time and now also traveling with your partner? What do you see as some, and also opportunities, like challenges, opportunities, maybe some little secret you would like to share with us on how to make this happen?

Bailey Lammon:

I think the secret is that you have to stay independent, which can also be such a struggle Because, like when you're both full-time travelers, it can get so difficult deciding where you want to go next, how long you're going to be there. What does your everyday life look like? What kind of activities do you enjoy versus what they enjoy? Do you spend all your time together? Do you take breaks? So I think, like for my boyfriend and I, we stay super independent, and this is something we've kind of like after three years. Now, you know, sometimes we're better at this than not.

Bailey Lammon:

But I think the biggest struggles have come when we start to become a little bit codependent on each other and think like no, you shouldn't go there, because I want to go there with you, but I want to go here and you want to go here.

Bailey Lammon:

So it's like always figuring out how do you make each other happy at the same time.

Bailey Lammon:

And so we end up moving or splitting up, I guess, and sometimes that means just casually splitting up, like okay, hey, you know, I want to stay in Mexico one more week, whereas you want to travel to Peru, like now. So you got to Peru, I'll meet you there in a week, you know wherever, or sometimes we've fully broken up because we didn't know. You know what's this next step look like for us, like I need to do this with my life and you need to do this with your life, and so we're going to, you know, separate, because this could be one month, this could be three months, this could be a year where we might not see each other. So we're going to do what's best for us, or you know each other, and we're going to split up, luckily with Kali and Roy's kind of come back together, because we realized, like you know, how much better we are together, but if we didn't take these times apart, our relationship wouldn't be what it is.

Bailey Lammon:

So I think that the fact that we do stay true to ourselves and say you know what? This is what's best for me at this time and we have so much respect and love for each other to say, yeah, like I understand where you're at in your life, where I'm at my life, we're just going to do what we need, and if that means we come back together, that's amazing. And if not, then see you later. Like, thanks so much for being such a great part of my life. Yeah, I think the independence, like believing in yourself to be the you that you want to be in the world and trusting the other person to come the same way.

Kendra Hasse:

Like it's interesting. I really hear this independence mindset in a relationship that we, as digital nomads, have this urge of freedom, of being independent and flexible, and now bringing it into this concept of relationship that usually is just dependent. So, yeah, that sounds also like really interesting and I think it's a good thought starter for some of our listeners.

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, I hope.

Kendra Hasse:

And then. So then, now, as I like currently, you are like having your own business for traveling, to organize travels for other people, right?

Bailey Lammon:

Yes.

Kendra Hasse:

And in the beginning you shared with me, like when we were talking. Say what, lee, that you create, like different styles of travels, yes, maybe. Maybe you can explain it a little bit with us, because I also think it's something interesting, because I feel as a digital nomad. We are all in a kind travel planner, right? We put so much time in organizing logistics and buying flight tickets, train tickets, and think where do we go next, what do we do? And maybe sometimes it's also a little piece of mind having someone who is doing it for you, in case you're not enjoying it so much, or the other way around, as you did it. See, oh, it's really something I like, so I could start making money out of it.

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, yeah, there's so many ways to travel. It's crazy. And personally, what I do is mostly not plan, which is kind of surprising why I'm such a good planner for other people, because in the beginning and even up until now, it's like we plan for one week ahead of us and then we'll say, okay, well, you know, here's some ideas, but we'll really just go with the flow. But for other people they're not like that. They really need this structure, this plan, this perfect Airbnb or perfect hotel or, and I get it.

Bailey Lammon:

The worst thing ever is jumping on a tour and it being like the worst tour ever and you're like, oh shit, I could have planned ahead. But I think that's maybe what my superpower is, also because I guess I'll get back to all these different ways that I plan. But for me, I kind of go through all of the hardship so that my clients don't have to. I buses and go to the wrong bus station because there's two bus stations. Oh my God, who knew? So yeah, so I'm really an analytical person and so when I am searching for my own Airbnb or hostel you know I'm super detailed about it I'm like, okay, who has a more than two gas burners and this one has a shower that actually has a lit rather than just like an open bathroom, or this hostel has this, or this hotel has that. Like I'm so detailed about these things and I get really obsessed with them.

Kendra Hasse:

I usually plan travels to the countries where you already have been, or do you also plan travels to countries that you haven't been to yet?

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, that's the question I get all the time. I do both because I only have been. Okay, it's hard to say this only thing, but you know I've been to 27 countries, which is so amazing, and but at the same time you know there's 197. So there's no way that I could plan only for these 27 countries, because then I would barely ever get any clients. The benefit is that I have this huge network of travel agents, so for places that I haven't been, I can use this network of people who have been and I've got so many friends around the world. Now that I can.

Bailey Lammon:

I'm always messaging them like, hey, I'm planning a trip here. You lived in Dubai for six months. Like, tell me some things. You know, I'm leveraging my network and my friends to kind of end. Also, I read blogs like crazy and watch YouTube videos and read reviews and I'm just like really obsessed with these things. I have such a good time with it. So, yeah, I plan all over the world and specifically around the world, trips Like this is what I really am hoping to continue to focus on is helping people actually make this logistics of traveling around the world, because it's such a daunting task. It's a huge thing to put on your plate, and I'm ready to help people do that.

Kendra Hasse:

And you said I see a car with Lee in Georgia. So let's picture this If I would like contact you now to plan my travel to Georgia, what would be like some? What would you tell me Like? What are like recommendations or whatever? What should I be aware of?

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, well, I really like to get to know my clients like really personally. So I asked them all kinds of things like what are you actually interested in and how much time do you have, of course, and do you want to see just highlights? Or I really love nature, I love hiking, I love finding these like serene spots to walk around in the green parts of cities, and then also adventure. So I guess my clients are really well. So, if you told me something like I want to drink wine because this is a big thing to do in Georgia, I want to hike some mountains and I want to get to know, you know, georgian culture.

Kendra Hasse:

And then let's add to it that we are like digital nomads, that we need to have good Wi-Fi doing yes.

Bailey Lammon:

The benefit of Georgia is that you can get unlimited SIM cards for super cheap. So even if you don't have great Wi-Fi somewhere here in Georgia, you can always switch over to your unlimited data package and be perfectly fine. For the day which happened to us while we were staying in the Thonitse region, which is the big mountains and the Wi-Fi and the power would cut out constantly in this guest house we were in, but we were perfectly fine working all day, because unlimited SIM cards, that's great.

Kendra Hasse:

And, what I like, the some areas we need to visit in Georgia. Really, really beautiful color and even the Haus limelt at sunset and, like many new, much Silenceע. I'd rather open a distribution room for a middle-aged estate agent.

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, so definitely the Saquette region, which is the wine region. The two main places are Telavi and Signagi, which is where I'm at now, and the hospitality here is just unbelievable, like they're just people who want to make you feel like your home and give you lots of wine and conya, and conya can feed you big feasts and yeah, it's great. And then, of course, the Swannati region, which is like big mountains and really strong culture, beautiful, for, like, you can do multi-day hiking out there, like through hikes you can do some day hikes and just enjoy this big mountain region Amazing.

Kendra Hasse:

And then it's Jaja, also a digital nomad country. So do you feel there's a huge digital nomad community?

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, there's a huge digital nomad community here in Tbilisi. It's super expat friendly. You can get a 12 month visa for free. You've got lots of really unique food. There's like a really good kind of I guess underground techno scene. It's beautiful architecture. Georgia is like just a very artsy kind of free country. It's amazing. Yeah, lots of digital nomads there.

Kendra Hasse:

So now, if I want to think, wow, georgia could be my next stop, what are some advices or maybe some challenges they should have in mind? Or is everything like super smooth?

Bailey Lammon:

Honestly, it's pretty smooth. I mean, if you know Russian, that's a big plus. But basically a lot of people speak English not a ton of people, but Google translate is super easy. You're going to take mini buses everywhere, so for some people that's not super nice, but you can also rent a car. The drivers in Georgia are a little bit rough. I think they say that in a lot of countries, but it is a little bit rough here and some parts worse than others. So, for example, you hear don't go to Chichete region on your own in a car because it's really dangerous. Heave the warning because it's probably really dangerous. But basically everywhere you can get by renting a car for super cheap is amazing little pockets. But if you don't want to rent a car, then you'll have to take the mini buses, and so if anyone has ever dropped a lot of mini bus nose, they're sick on them easily. So basically, just bring some Dramamine and everything else in this country will be easy and perfect.

Kendra Hasse:

Cool, Thank you. One thing before we come to the end of the podcast. As I said in the beginning, I really love their comment that you love to get to know humans. So and you already shared that you love to ask about their stories. So what are usually questions you're asking and what are interesting answers you're getting?

Bailey Lammon:

Well, when I say I love to get humans, love to get to know humans, I do mean everyone, like especially travelers, because I'm so fascinated by them, but also by the local people and I really love learning about their past and what they are taught in school and what they know about other countries and what their religions teach them. And men yeah, everything. Just getting to know people's culture locally can teach you so much about this world. So what do I normally hear from people? I mean you get like the kind of same human story, right, like everyone wants to be loved and love themselves and everyone wants a good job and to be able to take care of themselves, take care of their family, and you don't really hear that everyone always wants to travel. When you get locally, unless you speak to travelers, then you hear that they want to have a good time. And would you?

Kendra Hasse:

say that your life cycle currently brings you the love that we are all seeking for.

Bailey Lammon:

Yes and no. I actually would probably lean more towards no, which is really a sad thing. I think that's the one thing that is the hardest about being a digital nomad is, no matter how many awesome people that you meet and good times that you have on the weekends, I think that there's still this little bit of a lack of the roots of the community, unless you stay for a long enough time, but then you kind of still end up in a spot where you leave and have to kind of start over. And so being a digital nomad yeah, I think this is the hardest thing, which I also hear from many, many others is they want to make real friends and do that kind of stuff, get lonely. Even traveling with a boyfriend, I would still say it can get a little bit lonely, and if you don't take that time and make the effort to make the friends and stay connected with your loved ones at home, then you don't get all the love and happiness that I think everyone craves.

Kendra Hasse:

And do you fear? We can make this meaningful connection and this friends being like with other digital nomads that are on the road and staying connected digitally.

Bailey Lammon:

Oh is this yeah, I mean, most of my relationships are digitally and, to be honest, that is usually enough for me. Like I, you know the people that I do want to stay connected with. As long as you know, I'm kind of that annoying friend that like replies to every story and like I'm the weird and that like posts on this, you know Nephew's posts and whatever, like hope you're doing well or this looks awesome, and. But this is the way that I really feel like I do stay connected, especially thanks to social media. I didn't have social media. This would, this would not work, but I do feel like it's possible to keep really good connections. It just takes effort Climb.

Kendra Hasse:

So I yeah, and I feel it's really like this balance, for me at least between I really want to stay connected to the loved ones back home, or you met doing travel links and you really feel well from this little seat we met once you know they can really bless them a beautiful friendship, but this all digitally, versus really making this effort of meeting new people in person at the new place where you are, while you are having like this, this hard work life because of the decision, because we also need to make our money, so it's like this continuously dance between it.

Bailey Lammon:

Yeah, it's all cyclical emotions, relationships, money, adventure. Yeah, everything has its ups and downs, sure.

Kendra Hasse:

And now talking about what I feel and that's, on the other end, also the beauty about it right, with little new magics here and there we could have not imagined that are just happening, we are able to go with it though Exactly. Yeah, anything else. You would like to share anything? I didn't ask you anything you feel that needs to be heard from you in this episode.

Bailey Lammon:

Well, hopefully my ABA student take me down too many rabbit holes without answering any questions. So I just hope that, like you know, even if you don't feel like and I guess this is kind of where my job comes in it's like even if you don't feel like you're capable of doing all of the logistics, because it is a huge task to continuously travel, but I hope that you still take the leap and seek out support, because there are people who are ready to help and might not even cost as much as you think, or maybe you can get free advice or you know nowadays that we live in such a connected society. There's always somebody out there who can help you get to the hard parts of figuring out how to make your dreams come true. So if you have a dream and you want to come true, look for the people who can help you.

Kendra Hasse:

I love it. That's amazing. I think that's a nice quote also from you to finish, and if anyone wants to contact you, maybe wants to talk a little bit more about your story, or even is considering reaching out for your support for the next travel planning, we will put your link in the show notes so everyone can find you there, and contact you there.

Bailey Lammon:

The best place to find me is Instagram. I have my website, of course, anyone can go there, but the best place is definitely Instagram. I'm not always on it, but I will always respond within 24 hours, that's good to know, cool.

Kendra Hasse:

Thank you so much for your time and thank you, maybe our travel plans. Course, I didn't ask you what is your next destination after Georgia. Do you already know?

Bailey Lammon:

Yes to the couple places Armenia, dubai to end up in India. So that's our next big one is India, and then some countries to get there.

Kendra Hasse:

Great, so anyone who's planning to go to India, maybe we'll meet you there.

Bailey Lammon:

Yes, please, that would be super fun.

Kendra Hasse:

Great, thank you. I wish you a nice day.

Bailey Lammon:

Thank you to your kindra.

Anne Claessen:

And that's it for today. Thank you so much for listening. I appreciate it very, very much. I would appreciate it even more if you could leave a review on Apple podcasts for me. That way, more people can find this podcast, more people can hear the inspiring stories that we're sharing, and the more people we can impact for the better. So, thank you so much if you are going to leave a review. I really appreciate you and I will see you in the next episode.

Journey of a Digital Nomad
Transitioning From Backpacker to Digital Nomad
Independent Travel Planning for Digital Nomads
Travel Experiences and Digital Nomad Life